Keeping Organized – A Free Webinar

8 09 2010

One of the things that many low budget productions suffer from, as well as nearly all student films, is a lack of organization. It makes those tougher films even harder, but no one ever feels they have the time to set up their systems.

This is crazy shortsightedness and to give a few examples of what I mean by organization, I’m going to take some examples from my book, THE FILM EDITING ROOM HANDBOOK, 4th Edition, and present them (in my usual rambling fashion) during a webinar being given by the good folks over at New Media Webinars.

Every editor does things differently, and Shane Ross has done a pretty good DVD on the subject within Final Cut Pro. I’m going to toss my own thoughts into the ring  tomorrow, Thursday, September 9, 2010 at 10am Pacific time.

There are some good things about this webinar — the first is that it’s free, if you can make it at that time (NMW will be making the webinar available for a fee afterwards, along with some added content — a video where I’ll talk about organizing a VFX  workflow, as well as a copy of the glossary from my book). You’ll also get a chance to win some prizes, always a good thing.

Finally, I think that you’ll learn some things and, if you haven’t, you’ll have a chance to ask questions.

It should be a blast.  And you don’t even have to be in LA to see it.  So, c’mon down.  Just click on the link below.

Editing Bootcamp. Get Organized!!


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7 responses to “Keeping Organized – A Free Webinar”

9 09 2010
Sex Mahoney (04:14:07) :

This is tremendously exciting. I look forward to it.

9 09 2010
Sex Mahoney (18:45:17) :

This was tremendously informative, thank you.

Most useful piece of information:

place a period or z before important/unimportant files/folders to influence sort order

Thank you for that.

13 09 2010
Rob Shaver (16:22:39) :

I’m sorry I missed this. I’ve read your book “THE FILM EDITING ROOM HANDBOOK” and found it fastening. It doesn’t really apply to the kind of digital acquisition projects I work on but it was interesting hearing about how the big boys work, or used to work, when shooting with film.

I watched the preview for the 90 minute video produced from the webinar. Maybe it’s because, as an engineer/programmer, I’ve been organizing lots of computer data for the last 30 years but after editing a few projects in FCP I’ve created my own system for keeping track of my footage.

Documentary footage is defiantly harder to label and track than narrative footage. The script gives you a content-driven structure to build on right off the bat with scene and take numbers. The one long doc I edited lead us to organize the clips with the date, place and subject first. Then we generated a transcript from the dialog and spent quite a bit of time editing on paper … discovering the story we wanted to tell.

Anyway, I’d love to see/hear your webinar but $25 just seems too costly. I guess the market is small so the price needs to be high enough to make it worth the publisher’s price. If you ever lower the price to perhaps $5, let me know. (I am known for being quite frugal … okay, cheep … so for heaven sakes don’t take this personal. :-)

Peace,

Rob:-]

p.s. Here’s a tip I use when naming multi-camera narrative clips. I want the clips from the multiple cameras to sort together in the bin so I name them so they do. Here’s the template for each clip name:
—-
where
is a three letter show identifier
is a three digit episode identifier
is a three digit scene number from the shooting script
is a two digit take number
is a single digit camera identifier with A as the first camera, etc.

So when I worked on the show Shades of Life, a two-camera DV cable access program the clips might look like this:

SOL-104-004-01-A
SOL-104-004-01-B
SOL-104-004-02-A
SOL-104-004-02-B
SOL-104-005-01-A
SOL-104-005-01-B

We’d trim the start point on each scene to the slate snap. Then we’d take the best take for camera A and lay it into the timeline and camera B from the same take would overlay it with the opacity set to 50%. We’d then pick the A or B angle by changing the opacity of the top layer to either 100% or 0%. (This was before FCP had the multi-camera clip capability.)

After the footage was imported I always went back and renamed the clips in the file system then brought them back into the bin. This way every clip had a unique name on the disk no matter what folder it was in. I don’t like duplicate file names that are dependent for their identity by what folder they reside in.

Anyway, that’s my $.02 worth. rs

13 09 2010
Rob Shaver (16:31:53) :

Well, in addition to my other mistakes in the above comment, this comment system is angle-bracket phobic. I’ll never understand why people use such broken comment systems written by lazy programmers. (Yes, I understand they are just trying to protect the web site from evil HTML code injection, but their are more user-friendly ways to do it.)

So in the above comment I’m repeating what I said in a way I hope the software will accept.

Here’s the template for each clip name:
[show]-[episode]-[scene]-[take]-[camera]
where
is a three letter show identifier
is a three digit episode identifier
is a three digit scene number from the shooting script
is a two digit take number
is a single digit camera identifier with A as the first camera, etc.

I hope the software accepts square brackets.

13 09 2010
Rob Shaver (16:34:20) :

Third time’s the charm.

Here’s the template for each clip name:
[show]-[episode]-[scene]-[take]-[camera]
where
[show] is a three letter show identifier
[episode] is a three digit episode identifier
[scene is a three digit scene number from the shooting script
[take] is a two digit take number
[camera] is a single digit camera identifier with A as the first camera, etc.

15 09 2010
Norman (04:20:34) :

Rob,

This is great system especially if it works for you. The point of my seminar is to be organized in a way that helps you to make the interface as seamless as possible. You want to edit, not figure out how to push the buttons to edit.

That means that the system that works for one person will certainly not work for everyone. In the Olden Days there was “The System” that editors in NYC used to organize themselves. When I first started editing in LA it amazed me how some things were the same but many things were different..

So, the best system is the one that helps you to think more like an editor, and less like a librarian. Thanks for the description of yours. If anyone else out there has suggested systems, please chime in.

Norman

15 09 2010
Norman (04:21:08) :

Sex,

Thanks so much for attending the webinar. Really glad you could make it.

Norman

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